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It’s funny, that as I sit here watching The Voice… I’m being asked to write about my writing voice.  Many of you … most of you … have never heard me speak, before.  If you have, though, you know that I write how I speak.

My writer’s voice is not dissimilar to my speaking voice.  Granted, when I write, I tend to throw in a slightly more flowery vocabulary, probably because I have the time to think through what I’m writing and while I do type with great speed, I speak much more quickly.

That said, I’ve had many people comment that after the first time they’ve read something I’ve written, it’s very easy for them to hear me reading it in their heads while they read the pages themselves.  This strikes me kind of like all those memes where something random is written but it’s pasted on a picture of, like, Morgan Freeman… and I don’t know about you, but when I see words written on a picture of the likes of Morgan Freeman, or James Earl Jones… I can’t help but hear them reading it in my head.

Granted, there are tools that help me accomplish this.  I am a huge, huge fan of two major punctuation marks.  The ellipse ….. and the comma.  They accomplish for me the pauses and effects that I use in every day speech.  The ellipse especially, if you’ve been reading my stuff for any length of time, you’ll know I use frequently.

I love my writer’s voice.  That’s probably best since it’s so similar to my every day speaking voice.  The only (small) issue is that given how similar my writing and speaking voices are, I find that when I try to write in a voice other than my own, it’s so deeply engrained that it’s very difficult.  It tends to be why (I feel, anyway) I excel in my own ramblings, and less in fiction.  I struggle to separate myself from individual characters when I try to write fiction.

And there you have it, there’s my writing voice!

This post was written for BlogHer’s NaBloPoMo, which, for the month of March, is focused on ‘self.’

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