The Memory Weaver | A Book Review


Most of the time, when I read a book and there are lines in it that really hit me, I either underline them, take pictures of the page with my phone, or stick sticky notes in the book.

This book had so many deep, thought provoking lines in it about how we weave memories together, whether the memories are real or somehow got twisted in our brains as time passed, but ….. I couldn’t write any of them down or do anything about them.

This month got away from me, and in order to finish this book by the appropriate review deadline, I downloaded an audio book version of it so I could listen to it in the 11 hours I’ve spent in my car in the last 5 days.  I could not have read the book that quickly, so I am very thankful this month for a free trial of the Amazon Audible app, which gives you one free audio book and a month’s use for no charge.  If you try it out though, you’ll want to remember to cancel your Audible membership afterward if you don’t intend to keep it, otherwise it’ll be one of those things that slips onto your credit card without your remembering it happened until you get the bill.  I’m not speaking from experience on this particular experience, but it happened to me with Amazon’s PRIME free trial, so…. off I go to cancel my membership, haha.

Disappointment aside that I didn’t get to write down and share some of the stellar quotes about weaving our memories through our consciousness with you, I can tell you that I really enjoyed listening to this book.

I’m not sure that I would have enjoyed reading it, but I guess I’ll never know, now!

Here’s the excerpt:

Eliza Spalding Warren was just a child when she was taken hostage by the Cayuse Indians during a massacre in 1847. Now a mother of two, Eliza faces a new kind of dislocation; her impulsive husband wants to make a new start in another territory, which will mean leaving her beloved home and her mother’s grave–and returning to the land of her captivity. Haunted by memories and hounded by struggle, Eliza longs to know how her mother dealt with the trauma of their ordeal. As she searches the pages of her mother’s diary, Eliza is stunned to find that her own recollections tell only part of the story.

I love that this was based on a true story — the story of a strong woman fighting to sort out which of her memories of a traumatic past actually happened, and which are the result of twisted details and some imagination.

It was really interesting to me how Jane Kirkpatrick literally wove the memories through the story of Eliza’s present, mixing her past in so well with the current plot timeline.  It was also interesting to me how well edited the book was — making sure that the diary entries from Eliza’s mother were included in just the right places, which gave me as the reader/listener insight into Eliza’s life that Eliza hadn’t gleaned yet.  It was like learning about Eliza as she learned about herself.

I highly recommend this book if you like interesting writing.  The details were vivid, truly painting a picture.  For me, if I’m going to visualize a book, I need those details because my brain will otherwise not bring out a picture.  This is the first book where I’ve been able to picture the setting and the characters in a long time!  I found, too, that the details helped me bond with the characters.

I’m sure that so much thought, research, and time went into the writing of this book, and I have a huge respect for that.

If you’re looking a deep, thought-provoking read, head on over to amazon or your nearest Christian book store and pick this up.  I doubt you’ll be disappointed.

Also — can I have the dress that Eliza’s wearing on the front cover of the book?  I know it’s not a real thing…. and I know it’s not in fashion right now, but I’d wear that everywhere…. except when I missed my sweat pants or my flared, intentionally tattered and ripped jeans.  I love 2015 🙂

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I received this book as part of the Nuts About Books program with Graf Martin Communications, Inc. in conjunction with Baker Publishing Group, and was not required to give a positive review.

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4 thoughts on “The Memory Weaver | A Book Review

  1. This sounds rather magnificent. One of those books you’ll remember. Off I go to ad it to my wishlist. (Hope you remembered to cancel your Audible membership 😛 )

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