Cold Shot


I loved this book.  From page one to the very end, I was guessing and sharply taking in breath…. “who did it?  Will they be ok?”

If you like a book that will keep you up half the night, promising yourself “just one more chapter,” wondering if the beloved characters will make it out alive, then I promise you, you’ll like Cold Shot, the first of the Chesapeake Valor series by Dani Pettrey.

There was also just enough history in the book — uncovering what they thought would be Civil War remains, until it turned out they weren’t…. to keep this history nerd happy.  What was nice though, is that the historical details didn’t overwhelm the plot of the book, which wasn’t historical.  I’ve visited that area of the States, purely for its history, so it was fun to relive it through someone else’s eyes as I read this novel.

Here’s the synopsis:

Four Best Friends.
And Then One Went Missing . . .

In college, Griffin McCray and his three best friends had their lives planned out. Griffin and Luke Gallagher would join the Baltimore Police Department, Declan Grey would head to the FBI, and Parker Mitchell would study to become a crime scene analyst. But then Luke vanished before graduation and their world–and friendships–crumbled.

Now years later, Griffin has left the police and his friendships behind. Still trying to forget a case that went bad when he was a SWAT team sniper, he’s living a quiet life as a park ranger at Gettysburg. Quiet until skeletal remains are uncovered near Little Round Top–and they aren’t Civil War-era.

Griffin just wants the case to go away, but charming forensic anthropologist Finley Scott discovers evidence pointing to the work of an expert sniper. When FBI agent Declan Grey steps in to take over the case, past and present collide. Griffin soon realizes he’ll need to confront some of the darkest days of his life if he–and those he cares about–are going to escape a downward spiral of crime, danger, and murder.

Side note:  Can I tell you how much I love the name Declan?  I always have…. and the fact that I now have a character as a namesake who’s a little tamer than an IRA sniper (The Jackal, 1997 — with Richard Gere and Bruce Willis) makes my heart happy.

I digress.  The only real fault I found with this book was that I found the female characters were constantly being protected.  To an extent, that’s nice.  It’s romantic and all, but nearing the end of the book I was feeling exasperated for them, and particularly for the main female character, Finley, because Griffin was very protective of her, as if there were no indication that a leading forensic anthropologist could take care of herself.  It reminded me a bit of the TV show Bones…. and perhaps that’s why I found the female lead a bit too helpless for my liking.  If you’ve seen the show, you’ll understand what I mean.

If you like TV shows like Bones, though, this book will be a great read for you.  And if you swoon when men are protective of the women they care about, then my mild fault finding mission won’t even matter!

Have you read it?  What did you think?

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Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

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