Under the Summer Sky


I had a bit of a hard time getting into this book to start with.  It took me a few chapters to be able to see through how much I really didn’t like the antagonist and was annoyed by her, before I could actually get into the plot of this book.

Granted, contemporary romance isn’t typically my favourite genre, so you’ll have to take my words with a bit of a grain of salt, I suppose.  I prefer historical fiction and Westerns, and so this was a bit of a one-off.  I picked this book because it’s set in Savannah, Georgia.  A few years ago, I went to Savannah for a week on vacation and I honestly think I left a piece of my heart there.  It’s SO beautiful, and idyllic, and replete with absolutely stereotypical Southern charm — plus, the history is rich (and I’m a nerd like that), they have pirate stories, and they have dolphins.  I was hoping to be brought back to my Savannah trip with this book.  And in many ways, I was.  If you’ve been to Savannah, this book will bring back memories.  If you’ve never been, I suspect it will make you want to (and I highly recommend that you do).

But I digress.

Once I got past how much I disliked the antagonist (though, to be fair, she’s set up instantly to be disliked, which is usually the point of having an antagonist — so Melody Carlson hit her mark on that one) I did really enjoy the book.  I read it very quickly, which is also not typical of me — but I wanted to find out how it ended.

By the time I got to the end, the only real criticism (and that’s too strong of a word, I think) I had left for this book was that I think it came to a conclusion too rapidly.  Another 10-20 pages could have drawn some of the details together a bit better without feeling like the book came to a crashing halt.  I remember getting to the last chapter, and realizing that the book was 20 pages shorter than I’d initially though because there’s a preview to another book at the back, and realizing that there was no way all the details could be tied up to my liking in like 8 pages.  I suppose it’s a compliment if you just don’t want the book to end and it’s come to that inevitable point too soon, right?

At any rate, here’s the press material for “Under a Summer Sky” by Melody Carlson, which I recommend if you’re looking for a light, quick, airy, summer romance novel:

High school art teacher Nicole Anderson is looking forward to a relaxing summer in Savannah, house-sitting and managing an art gallery for a family friend. The house is luxurious in a way that only old money could make it, and the gallery promises interesting days in a gorgeous setting. Yet it isn’t long before her ideal summer turns into more than she bargained for: a snooty gallery employee who’s determined to force her out, a displaced adolescent roosting in the attic, and two of Nicole’s close childhood friends–who also happen to be brothers–vying for her attention.

With a backdrop of a beautiful historical city, incredible architecture, and even an alleged ghost or two, combined with the opportunity for romance . . . anything can happen!

Bestselling and award-winning author Melody Carlson invites readers to spend the summer surrounded by beauty and tantalizing possibilities for the future.

I see as I look at Amazon for the press material that Melody Carlson has a line of historical fiction as well — that’s where my heart loves to read, so I wonder — has anyone read any of her historical fiction novels?  Do you have any to add to my gigantic ‘to be read’ pile?

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Source

Book was provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

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